Extraordinary
Women

  • Rose Antonia Maria Valland

    Rose_Valland_small

    Rose Antonia Maria Valland (1 November 1898 – 18 September 1980) was a French art historian, a member of the French Resistance, a captain in the French military, and one of the most decorated women in French history. She secretly recorded details of the Nazi plundering of National French and private Jewish-owned art from France.

  • Lea Cabrielle

    Lea_Cabrielle_small

    Lea Cabrielle A graduate of the United States Naval Academy, she served as a fighter pilot and intelligence operations officer in the U.S. Navy from May 1997 to June 2009. She flew the single-seat, carrier-based F/A-18 “Hornet” aircraft in combat operations, and later deployed with a U.S. Special Operations Team as an intelligence operator supporting combat missions. She continues to volunteer as a guest speaker and emcee for charitable and promotional events supporting members of the military, their families and veterans. She now works as a journalist for the Fox news Channel.

  • Megan McClung

    McClung_small

    Megan McClung was the first female United States Marine Corps officer killed in combat during the Iraq War. Major McClung was serving as a public affairs officer in Al Anbar Province, Iraq when she was killed.

  • Rear Admiral Sandra Stosz

    Rear Admiral Sandra Stosz

    Rear Adm. Sandra Stosz became the first female superintendent at any of the U.S. service academies. A 1982 Coast Guard Academy graduate and a surface operations officer with 12 years of sea duty, Admiral Stosz has plotted a course that includes many firsts for women in the military. Her performance in previous assignments as commanding officer for recruit training at Coast Guard Training Center Cape May, N.J., the Director of Reserve and Leadership, and the commanding officer of two cutters, has demonstrated a commitment to building a diverse workforce.

  • Nancy Grace Augusta Wake

    Nancy Wake

    Nancy Grace Augusta Wake (August 30, 1912 – August 07, 2011), also known as the “White Mouse”, was one of the most decorated secret agents of the Second World War. By war’s end in Europe she had become famed as a resourceful, dauntless Resistance leader, who topped the Gestapo’s most-wanted list and had saved hundreds of Allied lives. She parachuted behind enemy lines, dodged bullets many times, rode a bicycle 250 miles to alert the French resistance to the Normandy invasion, was involved in ambushing German convoys and destroying bridges and railway lines.

  • Temple Grandin

    Temple Grandin

    Temple Grandin (born August 27, 1947) is an American doctor of Animal Science and professor at Colorado State University, bestselling author, and consultant to the livestock industry in animal behavior. As a person with high-functioning autism, Grandin is also widely noted for her work in autism advocacy and is the inventor of the hug machine designed to calm hypersensitive persons.

  • Bessie Coleman

    Bessie Coleman

    Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman (January 26, 1892 – April 30, 1926) was an American civil aviator. She was the first female pilot of African American descent and the first person of African American descent to hold an international pilot license.

  • Nora Roberts

    Nora Roberts

    Nora Roberts (born Eleanor Marie Robertson, October 10, 1950 in Silver Spring, Maryland, USA), is a bestselling American author of more than 165 romance novels, and she writes as J.D. Robb for the “In Death” series. She also has written under the pseudonym Jill March, and some of her works were published in the UK as Sarah Hardesty.

  • Helen  Keller

    Helen Keller

    Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The story of how Keller’s teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become known worldwide through the dramatic depictions of the play and film “The Miracle Worker”.

  • Sally Ride

    Sally Ride

    Dr. Sally Kristen Ride (May 26, 1951 – July 23, 2012) from Los Angeles, California, was an American physicist and a former NASA astronaut. She studied at Portola Middle School, Westlake School for Girls, Swarthmore College and Stanford University, and earned a master’s degree and PhD. Ride joined NASA in 1978, and in 1983, became the first American woman, and then-youngest American, to enter space. In 1987 she left NASA to work at Stanford University Center for International Security and Arms Control.

  • Carol Mutter

    Carol Mutter

    Carol A. Mutter (born December 17, 1945) is a retired United States Marine Corps lieutenant general. She is the first woman in the history of the United States Armed Forces to be appointed to a three-star grade. She retired from the Marine Corps on January 1, 1999. Her last active duty assignment was as Deputy Chief of Staff, Manpower and Reserve Affairs (DC/S, M&RA) at Marine Corps Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

  • Wilma Rudolph

    Wilma Rudolph

    Wilma Glodean Rudolph (June 23, 1940 – November 12, 1994) was an American athlete. Rudolph was considered the fastest woman in the world in the 1960s and competed in two Olympic Games, in 1956 and in 1960.

  • Sarah Deal Burrow

    Sarah Deal

    Lt. Col. Sarah Deal Burrow, United States Marine Corps, became the first female Marine selected for Naval aviation training, and subsequently the Marine Corps’ first female aviator in 1993.

  • Antonia Novello

    Antonia Novello

    Dr. Antonia Coello Novello, M.D., (born August 23, 1944) is a Puerto Rican physician and public health administrator. She was a vice admiral in the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and served as fourteenth Surgeon General of the United States from 1990 to 1993. Novello is the first woman and first Hispanic to serve as Surgeon General.

  • The Ruby Slippered Sisterhood

    The 2009 Class of Golden Heart Finalists, dubbed the “Ruby Slippered Sisterhood”.

  • Sandra Day O’Connor

    Sandra Day O'Connor

    Sandra Day O’Connor (born March 26, 1930) is an American jurist who was the first female member of the Supreme Court of the United States. She served as an Associate Justice from 1981 until her retirement from the Court in 2006. O’Connor was appointed by President Ronald Reagan in 1981.[2] During her tenure, she was regarded as the Court’s leading centrist, and was the swing vote in many cases; this made her the most powerful justice for many years.

  • Pvt. Minnie Spotted Wolf

    Minnie Spotted Wolf

    Private Minnie Spotted-Wolf (1923 – 1988) was the first Native American woman to enlist in the United States Marine Corps. She enlisted in the Marine Corps Women’s Reserve in July 1943.

  • Sergeant Kimberly Munley

    Sergeant Kimberly Munley a civilian Department of Defense police officer at Ft Hood credited with stopping the firing rampage of an Army Major within a few minutes after he launched his attack. Munley, a 35 year old petite mother of two, put her life at risk and drew the attention of shooter. She fired and took the man down. But not before she was shot three times. Munley is credited with preventing many more deaths.

  • Rosie the Riveter

    Rosie the Riveter

    Rosie the Riveter is a cultural and feminist icon of the United States, representing the American women who worked in factories during World War II, many of whom worked in the manufacturing plants that produced munitions and war supplies.

  • Wives of police officers, firemen, soldiers, sailors and marines

  • World War II Women Airforce Service Pilots

    World War II Women Service Pilots

  • SPAR Olivia Hooker: First African American Woman in the Coast Guard

    Olivia Hooker

    In February 1945, Olivia Hooker was sworn in by a Coast Guard officer, becoming the first African-American female admitted into the United States Coast Guard. Hooker joined the service to become a SPAR (Semper Paratus Always Ready), the acronym used for female service personnel during World War II. She remained in the Coast Guard until the war-time SPARs were disbanded by mid-1946. Dr. Hooker later earned a doctorate in psychology had a distinguished career as a professor.

 

 

From Twitter

  • OKAY. Homeland is too freaking intense 4 days ago
  • Happy to share the cover of my December release, Hunter’s Heart, a romantic suspense. The brilliant Kim Killion… fb.me/1nLJG3qTb 1 week ago
  • EEEP! Tornado warning for the Macon GA area. Take care guys. 2 weeks ago
  • Current temp 71. Today’s high 80. Tomorrow freeze warnings. Alrighty then. 2 weeks ago
  • KC 14 NE 0 Really! 2 months ago

 

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Point of No Return

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Fans of thrilling military romances will love Rita Henuber’s books.

Marine Major Honey Thornton is nobody’s fool, so when she’s brought in for an off-the-books mission by a manipulative two-star general, she has to wonder why. When it turns out Honey’s mission is to investigate a military contractor tied to the recent kidnappings of innocent children, she signs on immediately. Little did she know one of the first people she’d have to question was her sometime lover, Jack O’Brien.

Jack O’Brien left the CIA bitter and disillusioned and now hires himself out as a contract spy. When his brother and sister-in-law are mysteriously killed and the young daughter they left behind is targeted for kidnapping, he smells a cover-up and goes underground to find out who’s behind it all. Not sure who he can trust, Jack refuses to answer Honey’s questions and tensions flare.

With suspicion flaring on all sides and passion burning between them, Jack and Honey have to decide whether they can trust each other and bring down the people responsible, no matter how high up the chain of command it goes. Because when you’re navigating the murky political waters of the Pentagon, the CIA, and private armies, it’s hard to know who’s lying to your face, who stands with you, and who’ll stab you in the back. In the end the only thing you can trust is what you know in your heart.

 

No Holding Back

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Fans of erotic military romances will love this short, sexy work by Rita Henuber, a prequel to Point of No Return.

While on assignment, the last thing Marine Major Honey Thornton expected was to be called away for a meeting with the acting station chief in Islamabad. Even more surprising was the former CIA operative she met there, the ruggedly handsome and built-to-last Jack O’Brien. When attraction sizzles and the meeting turns out to be a bust, Honey and Jack decide to put their time together to more pleasurable uses.

Slipping off to Jack’s hotel, the two quickly come to an understanding: no commitments, and no holding back. As the two mesh perfectly and surrender to the intense passion, the only question is whether they’ll stick to the rules of their casual hookup or give in to the deeper connection that sparks between them.

 

May 19 2014, 11:10 am

 

Thank you for visiting this page.

I write about extraordinary women and the men they love. Military heroines. Women at the top of their field in a man’s world. They don’t want a man to take care of them they want a man who will accept them for who they are and stand shoulder to shoulder with them in their adventures. I’m frequently asked why I write military stories and more to the point why are my heroines the ones in the military.

Well, I come from a family, who over the years, have served in every branch of the service in every conflict since WWI. I have ancestors who served in British conflicts back to the early 1800’s. Two great, great, great, great uncles were in the Charge of the Light Brigade. Thomas Dunn, a corporal, and Alexander James Dunn, a lieutenant were members of the 11th Hussars, a British Army unit. Lieutenant Dunn was killed in the battle. Corporal Dunn was one of the fabled survivors.

I have stories of family in WWI but no proof. SO, fast forward to the next war to end all wars and I have many, many relatives who served. Some weren’t even in the military. Half of my family lives in Florida. Have since the early 1920s. An uncle owned several shrimp boats. One day, after the start of WWII, some scary guys in suits and uniforms showed up and said his boats were needed to protect the east coast from U-boats. There was no please. No thank you. No payment. All his boats were taken and he never got them back. He never complained. He was proud he could help.

My daddy trained Coast Guard recruits in Florida and Washington State, and patrolled in the North Atlantic riding shotgun for convoys.

Another Uncle was a Navy ace in that war and in Korea.

One uncle, on the other side of my family, was home in December 1941 for 30 days of leave before he was to report to his next duty. His next duty? The USS Arizona in Hawaii.

My husband’s uncle served in Germany.

Hubs was a Marine and served in Vietnam.

One son was with the first Marines into Bagdad in the Iraq war.

There are many others but I think you get the point. The military in is my DNA.

The next question is why write military heroines? I feel like the women in the service of this country are under appreciated.

George Washington credits winning the war against England to six colonial spies who risked their lives to bring him information. One of them was a woman whose name has never been discovered.

Dr. Mary Edwards Walker is the only woman to receive a Congressional Medal of Honor for her efforts during the Civil War. Her name was deleted from the Medal of Honor Roll in 1917. She was asked to return the medal and refused, wearing it every day until she died.

             Agnes Meyer Driscoll known as Madame X, an American cryptanalyst for the U.S. Navy during World War I was a brilliant code breaker.

During WWII over 1000 women in this country flew every type of military aircraft, ferrying them to military bases and departure points. They were test pilots and towed targets to give gunners training. Their service wasn’t recognized until the 70s

I have a special place in my heart for the nurses who took care of our soldiers in Vietnam.

The person who is credited with finding the terrorist leader who ordered the 9/11 attacks (I refuse to say his name) is a woman.

      My question is: why don’t we have more books with military heroines?

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06/27/2014 Blogging

Come by the Not Your Usual Suspects blog Friday June 27 and play Where In The World Am I.

http://notyourusualsuspects.blogspot.com/

06/18/2014 Goodreads Review

Received this Goodreads review for Point of No Return from Sunny. My agent said, “This is one of the most complementary reviews I’ve ever seen.” I agree. Thank you Sunny.
“Rita Henuber writes some of the strongest female characters in the romantic suspense genre. Her females are unapologetically smart, savvy, brave, and can compete with the male characters in almost every way. These are women you can admire for their brains and physical prowess. Her couples are truly a balanced partnership. So you can imagine with an alpha female, you’re gonna have a strong alpha male as well. Because of that, the action and romance in this book is intense and incredibly erotic. The thing that I appreciate most about this book (and other Rita Henuber books) is that her heroines avoid TSTL moments. They are just too smart and strategic for that.”

05/26/2014 THANK YOU to all my UK readers.

In the kindle store there, Point of No Return is #16 in Thriller/Military and Under Fire: The Admiral is #12 in Action Adventure/Military. Very exciting.

   

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