The Seguin Lighthouse – Haunted Lighthouse Series

Oct 17 2018, 10:05 am

 

The Seguin Lighthouse is in the Gulf of Maine on Seguin Island, south of the Kennebec River. Established in 1795, it is the second-oldest of Maine’s coastal lighthouses. The light station stands on the island’s highest point, and includes the lighthouse itself, the keeper’s house, fog signal building, a small oil house, and a 1006 foot tramway for bringing supplies from the shore to the site. The light, built from granite blocks, is 53 feet tall and 180 feet above sea level making it the highest in the state. The first tower was wood frame completed in 1797 and replaced by the present tower in 1857.

This light has quite the history and of course, it is haunted…..

 

Starting with the history part, on September 5, 1813 the epic sea battle between the HMS Boxer and USS Enterprise took place near Seguin. Yes. The name USS Enterprise has a long, glorious history.

More than a hundred light keepers have served at Seguin. There has been several women assistant keepers. Not a common thing in those days. Going through the list of keepers names I found it odd that some were removed from their position. For what reason? I can understand why many resigned. That island is pretty small and is said to be foggy fifteen percent of the time. The fog horn is so loud it can be heard fourteen miles away and keepers swear it has blasted birds from the sky.  BTW I don’t particularly care for fog.

Those who lived there had to be pretty self-sufficient. Electricity didn’t arrive until 1953 and from what I can tell it was kinda iffy at that. Did those that resigned get bored? Couldn’t take the isolation or get tired of being so self-sufficient?

Now here is where the weird stuff begins.     

Near the island, in July of 1875, a sea captain and ship’s crew reported seeing a monster that came to their boat and put its head over the rail. They struck it with a pike sending it back into the water. A few days later another boat reported seeing the serpent floating along occasionally raising it head to look around. WTH?

Many believe that the pirate, Captain Kidd, buried his gold and silver treasure on the island. In 1936, for a year, a man dug up the place looking for it but found nothing.

Sometime in the mid-1800s a murder suicide took place. A light keeper bought his wife a piano. Ah. Nice guy. She played the same tune over and over for hours upon hours until it apparently drove the keeper insane because he took an axe to the piano, his wife and himself. Eww. Doing yourself in with an axe? The mind boggles. The spooky thing is on quiet nights, the crews of ships going by the island say they can hear the tune playing over and over and over.

A young girl died and was buried on the island and many report still seeing her running up and down the stairs. Some have even heard her laughing.

There are other reports of items being moved or going missing, jackets being taken from hooks and thrown to the floor, and furniture rearranged.  

When the Coast Guard was packing up to leave the island in 1985 an apparition in oil skins begged a warrant officer to leave his furniture and home alone. The next day as the furniture was being loaded on a boat, chains broke and all the furniture fell into the ocean. Coincidence? Don’t know but my new rule is if a ghost asks me to leave his furniture and home alone, I’m not arguing.         

St. Augustine Lighthouse. Haunted Lighthouse series.

Oct 13 2018, 9:05 pm

 Happy Birthday to the St. Augustine, Florida Lighthouse

celebrating its 144th birthday this weekend.

 The St Augustine Light is an active light.  It stands 165 feet above sea level, with 219 steps to the top, and overlooks the Matanzas Bay and the Atlantic Ocean from Anastasia Island.  It is the first Florida light commissioned by the American government in 1824 and has a first order Fresnel lens now lit with a 1000 watt bulb.  The light is St. Augustine’s oldest surviving brick structure, and stands where, soon after arriving in the mid-1500s, the Spanish built a watchtower. A spot to watch over the town and see out to the ocean for 450 years. In modern times during World War II armed Coast Guardsmen used the tower to watch for enemy ships and submarines.

This light is also said to be haunted. Having grown up a couple of blocks from this light I can say I’ve been inside more times than I can count. To the top only a handful of times. I’d say half of those ‘visits’ were after dark.  Do I think it’s haunted? Well, let’s say during the day I’m a skeptic. At night – I believe. Mind you, I’ve never seen anything, but there is a feeling. That’s the only way I know how to explain.  

Who are these ghosts? There was a suicide by hanging and a man who fell from the first tower might be still around. A keeper and the wife of another keeper died there.  Three children died in an accident. Pirates were imprisoned and excited there. Some are buried on the grounds.   

Then there is the story about the original owner of the lighthouse who had the light taken from him by eminent domain and threatened never to leave. Some say his spirit still walks the tower late at night. Anyone of these men could be the cigar smoking ghost reported in the fuel house.

People say they’ve heard the laughter of children in the tower, and one has been seen, wearing the same blue dress she drowned in. Some have glimpsed a shadowy figure in the tower, a hand coming through the tower door and furniture moving around by itself.

I will also say if I’d seen anything I would never go back. The feeling in there is creepy enough.

According to the ghost hunters from the Syfy TV series Ghost Hunters there is paranormal activity there.  The main stars of the show, Jason Hawes and Grant Wilson, dubbed the lighthouse complex “the Mona Lisa of paranormal sites.”

Dozens of YouTube videos online are also devoted to paranormal events here.

Other researchers say the light is not haunted. Everything can be explained.  

What do you think?

 

 

 Yaquina Bay Lighthouse. Haunted Lighthouse Series.

Oct 11 2018, 9:27 am

     Yaquina Bay Lighthouse, is located on a hill overlooking the northern side of the entrance to Yaquina Bay, Oregon. The charming two-story clapboard structure was deserted a mere three years after its light was first lit in 1871 and it remained empty for fourteen years. In 1889 The Army Corps of Engineers used it to house one of their engineers and his family. That is, until it was heavily damaged in a hail storm and struck by lightning. It’s had spotty off and on use until it was privately purchased and relit in December 1996 as an aid to civilian navigation.

   Deserted and in disrepair, it has ever since been the scene for many a ghostly tale. The most famous being about Muriel Travenard, born at the end of the 18th century to a sea captain and his wife. Her mother died when she was young, and for a time she sailed with her father. When she was a teen he decided to leave his daughter behind with friends in Newport. Weeks lengthened into months, and the captain didn’t return. Muriel was unhappy but made friends with other teens, which helped to assuage her grief. Her group decided to explore the abandoned lighthouse. It was a mess, dilapidated, and not as much fun as they’d hoped, but they did find a strange iron plate in the floor on the second level. It was a door to a compartment that had a deep hole cut into it. They looked inside, but left the door open, and went off to explore the rest of the area. In the late afternoon, as they were preparing to leave, Muriel remembered she’d left her scarf inside and went back to get it. Her friends waited, but she didn’t return. Several went back in to look for her. After searching without success, one of the kids noticed a pool of blood on the floor, with a trail of drops leading to the iron plate, which was now—mysteriously— closed. The teens tried to open the door, but couldn’t. After coming back with help, a complete search of the lighthouse and grounds was made, and the plate was frozen in place and couldn’t be pried open.  Muriel, or her body, was never found, and a dark stain marks the floor where, what is believed to have been, her blood was found. No one knows what happened that fateful day. Over the years there are claims Muriel’s ghost has been seen  peering out of the lantern room or walking down the path behind the lighthouse.  

   Now here is where the story get a little wonky. It may or may not be true. All this falderal could have originated from Lischen Miller’s story, “The Haunted Lighthouse,” published in an 1899 issue of Pacific Monthly. A fictional account of a girl named Muriel Trevenard, who mysteriously disappeared in the lighthouse after returning to retrieve her handkerchief. 

Hmmm. So whatcha think? Fact or fiction? Did Ms. Miller hear the legend and write her story or, did the legend get legs from her story?

 

Books to Movies.

Sep 23 2018, 1:35 pm

Do you have Netflix? I don’t. I’m afraid I’d become a giant blob of algae sitting on the sofa watching all the good shows. Nothing would get done. No writing. No cleaning house. Well, have to say I’m lax on that already. I have Amazon Prime and it’s bad enough. My passion is movies and small screen series adapted from books. Love seeing book characters come to life. I do my best to read (actually I listen to the vast majority of books) a book before I watch the movie or series because, the book is always better. Right?

Some adaptations I’ve enjoyed are:  

The Martian. Of course there are book details left out of the movie production. But the movie was totally fantastic.

Bosch. Amazon Prime series. I’ve read all of Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch books and really enjoy the story of an older LAPD homicide detective. I also like how the production, working with Connelly, have taken story lines from different books and woven them together in episodes for a season.  If you’re into car chases and shootouts this isn’t for you. It’s definitely about the human side of police work.  

Amazon also has the Jack Ryan series. It isn’t directly from any of Clancy’s books. It does evoke what the Ryan stories are about. Kinda like how the 007 movies developed. I liked it. Seeing comments, people either loved it or didn’t.  I particularly like John Krasinski as Ryan.           

Outlander. Okay. I confess. I LOVE Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series. Time travel. Men in kilts. Epic love story. What’s not to like? Taking giganticus books and producing them for a TV series has to be a giganticus undertaking/headache. In which, it is difficult to please the purists book readers. If you are a fan and in any fan groups you will know of what I speak. From my perspective the casting is spot on. Acting, scenery, settings, and costumes are perfect.  Personally I’ve found very few things to get squinty eyed over. The series adds to the book story IMO.   

Mr. Mercedes. Made for TV series from Stephen King’s trilogy of the same name. It’s dark and disturbing and I love it. Not even minding changes from the book.   

Unbroken. WoW. If you haven’t read Louis Zamperini’s story of survival and overcoming I suggest you add it to your TBR list. I listen to parts frequently. The book was broken in 2 parts for movies. First part is war experiences and the second, which I haven’t seen, is how he overcame experienced horrors.    

The Monument Men. When I read the book I was floored I hadn’t heard the story before. My hubs and I are WWII history buffs and had seen much of the art and been to many places mentioned in the story. IMO the movie hardly did the story justice.

A favorite book, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society, was made into a film showing only on Netflix.  I sooo want to see the movie but, once I have Netflix there would be no going back.  Can you feel my pain?  

These are only a few books to the screen adaptations. Do you have any favorites?

 

Audio Books

May 17 2018, 4:04 pm in

     Do you have to get debris and aquatic critters out of the pool because you have hoards of guests coming to visit for the summer?

Need to get the knee high grass cut and clear the poison ivy away from the yard?

Convince the mosquitoes not carry off your guests?

Have to give the old home a good cleaning?

And….. all you want do is to read a good book?

 —Imagine me talking in a cheesy infomercial voice.—  

Well, have I got the solution for you.

Audio books.

Yes that’s right. You heard me-

Audio Books.

For busy people who love to read.

You can listen on your phone, E-reader, or laptop.

—End cheesy voice over—

 I’m here to tell ya listening to books will make the drudgery of cleaning closets, using the shop vac to suck the crumbs from the oven, and scrubbing those toilets a thing of the past. You’ll be so pleased to listen you’ll wish there was more work to do. Ehh. That last statement might be pushing it.

I started listening because of vision problems. Even with glasses over contacts, it was difficult to read. After five eye surgeries reading is much easier now but I’m totally hooked on listening. Many times I’ve foregone seeing a movie because the audio book production was so good.

The big thing is, I can listen to books and not feel guilty because I should be doing something else. ‘Cause I can do something else.  Except drive. I get too engrossed in the story. Shakes head here –Not a good thing. Now that I’m thinking about it, listening to the, shall I say, steamy parts, of a romance novel in the doctor’s office or in the dentist chair, eh, not good either. Well, it’s not bad that you’re listening to it there, it’s odd to explain why you’re fanning yourself and you’re hyperventilating. Whatever you do, just say no to the hygienist if she wants you to take out the earphones so she can also hear.

So, tell me, do you listen to your books? Do you have a favorite narrator?

I would know Dick Hill anywhere. He narrates many of my favorite books. Many actors lend their voices to books. If any of you are longtime watchers of Law and Order you remember there was a female psychologist on the show. Carolyn McCormick portrayed Dr Elizabeth Olivet, and narrates The Hunger Games Trilogy. I also have one narrator I will not listen too. Nope. He ruins the story for me.

I loved:

11-22-63

Water For Elephants

The Martian

Outlander Series and novellas

Michael Connelly Books—all of them

Barry Eisler

Jack Reacher Series

Stephen Kings Me. Mercedes Trilogy

The Hunger Games Trilogy

Neil Gaiman

I guess you get the picture.  

Tell me an audio book you enjoyed.

My first book Under Fire is available in audio format. Click here Audible to listen to a sample.

—WARNING—

Listening to Audio Books is habit forming.

 

National Library Week

Apr 9 2018, 4:51 pm in

I grew up in St Augustine Florida, the oldest city in the nation. History all round. Many buildings in use date to the early 1700’s. My grandparent’s home was built around civil war times.  

One was constructed around 1783, by Bernardo Segui.  It also was the home of Edmond Smith, the last Confederate general to surrender his command. He was born in the home in 1824. In 1863 Union officials exiled the general’s mother from the city for spying.   

The house came to be called the Segui-Smith House. In 1895 it was given to the city to be used as a library.  My library.

It’s a good possibility many of the books I perused on the shelves had been there since 1895. Really. It’s still in use as a research library, home to historical records. That building holds powerful memories for me.

Rainy afternoons sitting in a corner listening to rain tap a beat on the banana leaves and palm fronds in the courtyard. The rooms were dark and the library cards yellowed.  The wood floors upstairs creaked when no one stepped on them. The powerful musty scent of dust, old paper and history was comforting. I honestly can’t remember any books I checked out and if I remember correctly there were a set of encyclopedias from the 18th century. Yes, I am that old that I didn’t have a device to look everything up on not the 18th century part.     

I miss my library.   

Do you have fond Library memories?

April is National Poetry Month.

Apr 2 2018, 2:26 pm in , , ,

I know nothing about poetry. Except what speaks to me. When I open a book of poems I can honestly get lost in them. I marvel at the author’s ability to tell me a story in a few lines. To draw me in and make me feel. I’m sharing a few.

 

Impromptu – To Kate Carol – Poem by Edgar Allan Poe

When from your gems of thought I turn 
To those pure orbs, your heart to learn, 
I scarce know which to prize most high — 
The bright i-dea, or the bright dear-eye.

 

Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein

There is a place where the sidewalk ends
And before the street begins,
And there the grass grows soft and white,
And there the sun burns crimson bright,
And there the moon-bird rests from his flight
To cool in the peppermint wind.

Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black
And the dark street winds and bends.
Past the pits where the asphalt flowers grow
We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow,
And watch where the chalk-white arrows go
To the place where the sidewalk ends.

Yes we’ll walk with a walk that is measured and slow,
And we’ll go where the chalk-white arrows go,
For the children, they mark, and the children, they know
The place where the sidewalk ends.

 

The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost

Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;

Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,

And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

 

Oh, the Places You’ll Go! By Dr. Suess

Congratulations!
Today is your day.
You’re off to Great Places!
You’re off and away!
You have brains in your head.
You have feet in your shoes
You can steer yourself
Any direction you choose.
You’re on your own. And you know what you know.
And YOU are the guy who’ll decide where to go.

 

An Irish Poem ~Unknown

Death leaves a heartache
No one can heal
Love leaves a memory
No one can steal.

 

The Toucan by Shel Silverstein
Tell me who can
Catch a toucan?
Lou can.

Just how few can
Ride the toucan?
Two can.

What kind of goo can
Stick you to the toucan?
Glue can.

Who can write some
More about the toucan?
You can!

 

My Spoon ~Unknown Author
Greasy grimy gopher guts.
Mutilated monkey meat
Little dirty birdies feet
And I forgot my spoon.

~Unknown because who would admit to writing this?

Do you have favorite poems? Please share.

To learn more about Poetry Month click here 

MARCH IS NATIONAL WOMEN’S MONTH

Feb 28 2018, 9:01 am in , ,

 

Other special days in March are:

March 4th—the day all the animals marched forth from the ark.

March 17th—St Patrick’s Day

March 19th—St Joseph’s Day

And… there is March Madness. The month long NCAA basketball tournaments to determine the college national champions.

I write about Extraordinary Women so I asked my heroines what women they find inspiring and what their plans for the month of March are.

 

Olivia, from Under Fire, said she is in awe of the women who, hundreds of years ago, had the courage to leave their homes in Europe, get on tiny boats, cross the Atlantic and settle an unknown land.

She and Declan will be in Kansas City, MO for a business meeting on March 15th. They decided to stay a few extra days to see the St. Patrick’s Day parade. Then they’ll visit the notable, or notorious, depending on your point of view, Irish establishments in town. When I spoke with them, Declan was laughing about drinking green beer and then pe…. eh. Well, you know, green liquid in, green liquid out.

They’re staying at the Intercontinental Hotel on the Plaza. If you’re in Kansas City stop and visit. Just ask Ed, the doorman, where they are.

 

Gemma, from Under Fire: The Admiral, said she admires Nancy Augusta Wake, a British agent during WWII. Nancy was a courier for the French Resistance and in1943 was the Gestapo’s most wanted person.

Gemma and Ben will be in Boston for St Patrick’s Day enjoying the festivities with friends. They did share an experience they had a few months ago while visiting Ireland.  

They were in the Irish countryside on a very dark, stormy night–really it was–in the middle of nowhere. They’d stopped at a local pub for dinner and were enjoying the food, pints, and conversation when the pub door slammed open. A soaking wet, obviously upset young man stood in the doorway. He rushed in babbling about a horrible experience.

He was settled into a chair and given a pint. The beer was half-gone before he could string words into sentences and answer the many questions. The young man explained he was backpacking through Ireland and on a deserted road when it began raining so hard he could hardly see a few feet ahead of him. Finally, a car came slowly towards him and stopped. Desperate for shelter and thinking he was being offered a ride, he got in and closed the door only to realize there was nobody behind the wheel. Even though the engine wasn’t on, the car once again started moving. Ireland’s many ghost stories rumbled through his brain and fear paralyzed him. That is until he looked at the road ahead and saw a curve looming. Gathering courage, he prepared to jump. Then, through the driver’s window, a ghostly hand appeared out of gloom. In terror, he watched as the hand turned the wheel, guiding the car around the curve.

The lights of the pub appeared and gathering strength, he jumped out of the car and ran for it.

A silence enveloped the pub when everybody realized he was crying.  

Once again the door slammed open, startling everyone, and two men walked in from the dark and stormy night. They too were soaked and out of breath. Looking around, and seeing the young man sobbing at the bar, one said to the other…

“Look ….there’s that fookin idiot that got in the car while we were pushing it!”

 

Honey, From Point of No Return, answered after a long pause. “More than anyone I respect and admire the women who are married to military men, agents, police officers and firemen. They have an uncommon strength and bravery.”

She and Jack, are both rabid basketball fans and they’re hosting March Madness parties to watch the games and a huge St Pat’s Day party. Gloria, Kara, and Gunny will be there. Buck and Coop haven’t decided if they’ll come. Seems they’ve been invited to Florida by a couple of young ladies for spring break fun. What do you think they’ll do?

 

Celia, from Hunter’s Heart, shared she’d been reading about Eleanor Roosevelt and very much admired her.  

She and Hunter will be in Greystones, Ireland for St Patrick’s Day. She’d told Hunter she would love to visit the place where the landscape he gave her was painted. On Valentine’s Day, in a very romantic way she didn’t want to share, he surprised her with plane tickets to Ireland. Gotta love Hunter.

 

All my book characters say hello to you and hope to wave at you from the pages of future books.

I think that’s a hint for me to get busy writing.

 

Oh! In honor of the day all the animals marched forth from the ark– March 4th–everyone is invited to stop by for cake, animal cookies, and tea.

Christmas from Germany to Arizona

Dec 18 2017, 5:10 pm in , , , ,

Happy Holidays!

     The holiday season is upon us, and with it comes a tide of memories and traditions. I spent many of my early childhood years on an Air Force base in Stuttgart, Germany, and my parents adopted some of the customs of the region. We’d put our shoes outside the door on December 5th for St. Nicholas (his feast day is Dec. 6th) and if we were good, they were filled with goodies the next morning.

                                                                                                                                                                        We also had an Advent Calendar filled with chocolate, and nutcracker soldiers on our mantel. And something I didn’t recall until I was shopping at Cost Plus years ago…soft gingerbread cookies, frosted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

     When the military moved us to Texas (this time living off-base), we were introduced to new cultural traditions. Lining the sidewalks with luminarias, visiting the River Walk for beautiful lights and mariachi music, and eating tamales on Christmas day are all part of the local traditions in San Antonio. And, Las Posadas was a recreation of the Mary and Joseph’s journey from door to door, seeking refuge. The church would often recreate this in a nearby neighborhood.

 

     For the past several years, we’ve celebrated Christmas in northern Arizona, where snow is not unheard of. With three kids, I’ve maintained the tradition of the tree, stockings, and advent calendars. We deck the house out with lights. When my daughter was in ballet, part of our annual celebration was watching her dance in The Nutcracker while the local symphony played. 

 

     This year, we’ll have our Annual Gingerbread Houses (preassembled because, for me, nothing drives away Christmas cheer like having to assemble one of those things). We’ll bake snowball cookies because they’re my husband’s favorite, and decorate sugar cookies because my youngest loves those. And since my daughter loves the soft German-style gingerbread cookies, we’ll be making a visit to Cost Plus, too. At our house, Santa will more often find beer than milk, but no worries—he always makes it to the next house.

 

 

     A bittersweet note this year is the Polar Express. If you haven’t heard of it, it was an animated movie (starring Tom Hanks in multiple roles) based on a popular book. As we are a railroad town, a local train company (which usually travels to the Grand Canyon) puts together a Polar Express experience annually, and the movie is recreated for thousands of lucky children on an hour-long train ride in an old-fashioned train car. Santa even hands out a souvenir bell at the end, as he does in the movie. We’ve done this a couple times in the past, but this may be our last time. My youngest is still a believer, but, sadly, this will probably be the final year. He’s already questioning things, but seems eager to keep believing, so I’ve been vague in my answers unless he presses me. He hasn’t yet.

     Wherever and however you celebrate the season, Happy Holidays and good tidings to you and yours!

                         Cheers,

                                                Anne Marie

 

 

Anne Marie has always been fascinated by people—inside and out—which led to degrees in Biology, Chemistry, Psychology, and Counseling.  Her passion for understanding the human race is now satisfied by her roles as mother, wife, daughter, sister, and award-winning author of romantic suspense.  

She writes to reclaim her sanity.

Find ways to connect with Anne Marie at www.AnneMarieBecker.com. There, sign up for her newsletter to receive the latest information regarding books, appearances, and giveaways

The Christmas Tree

Dec 17 2017, 10:57 pm in ,

The Christmas Tree

 

     Queue the reel-to-reel… tat, tat, tat, goes the old reel-to-reel movie projector, blinking into focus…

 

     A red flatbed truck pulled into the drive and backed up to the porch of the old farm house. Five small children watched with wide-eyed wonder as two large Scott Irishmen hopped out of the cab. Squeals of excited laughter echoed off the porch ceiling. Dad and our uncle had brought home the biggest and best tree. Ever! In all the history of Christmas trees.

     Our mom was not happy with the huge tree. “Jack what have you done?” He grinned like a kid and winked at me. His response was a little slurred, “The kids ask for a big Christmas tree this year. So we found one. Come on, Cat. It’s not much bigger than any of the others we have had in the past.”

     After trimming the bottom and making a special tree stand, they stood the tree upright. The bottom branches took up over half the small living room. The top was bent at a forty-five degree angle with two feet of tree bent at the ceiling. My dad and uncle were laughing like school boys and my mom was fuming, especially when they laid it down and the top went out the front door.  

     They trimmed off the back of the tree and cut two feet off the bottom, stood it back up, and it fit flush against the wall. After the mess was cleaned up we decorated this most beautiful tree with what few glass ornaments and large Christmas lights we had and added a lot of tinsel to fill in the gaps.

     Dad put the gold glass star on the top and we all stood back to admire the tree.

     It seems that the star was the last thing the tree could handle as it came crashing down sending glass ornaments shattering in fifty directions.

     My uncle burst out laughing. My mom was furious because she had just cleaned up that mess and we were all devastated.

     My dad said, “Cat, I have this. You and the kids go out on the back porch and we will fix it.” Famous last words. Two slightly intoxicated Irishmen fixing something should be your first warning.

     Hammering and swearing should be your next one.

     When we came back inside, they had wired the top of the tree to the ceiling and…yes, being ingenious souls they hammered four three inch nails into mom’s hard wood floors.

     We almost lost my dad that day, because my little four-foot-nine, Cherokee French mom almost killed him. 

    I think of this story every Christmas.   

                 I did not bring any traditions from my past. I made my own.  

 Myself, I love Christmas and sometimes put up as many as seven trees. Hope you enjoyed this slice of my life and my Christmas decorations. 

                                              

      

 

 

 

Merry Christmas                                          Christine Galloway Evans      

 

 

                                  

                                              

Christine Galloway Evans was born in a small Texas town and in her youth worked with her uncle rebuilding cars. She earned a small business and Cosmetology degree from San Jacinto College.

Ms. Evans has worked in and owned a Hair Salon and Bridal Salon. She’s had several small businesses including one creating gift baskets for hospitals, and another making and selling stuffed animals.

Somewhere along the way, she realized that her true love was weaving stories and creating new worlds. To date, Ms. Evans has completed several short stories but is unpublished. 

 

Every day Christine posts Christmas photos guaranteed to make you smile on her facebook page . You can follow her here 

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